October 23 - Dr. Nemeroff

 

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences | Grand Rounds Series

Charles B. Nemeroff, MD, PhD Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Dell Medical School, University of Texas at AustinDell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin

Friday, October 23, 2020 | 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Live via Webex for more info | email psych-events@musc.edu

 

Paradise Lost: The Neurobiology of Child Abuse & Neglect

The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences hosts bimonthly Grand Rounds that span the academic year. Join us as we host Charles B. Nemeroff, MD, PhD is Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Dell Medical School, University of Texas at Austin. A large body of evidence has demonstrated that exposure to childhood maltreatment at any stage of development can have long-lasting consequences. This presentation summarizes the literature investigating the effects of childhood maltreatment on disease vulnerability for mood disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), specifically summarizing cross-sectional and more recent longitudinal studies demonstrating that childhood maltreatment is more prevalent and is associated with increased risk for first mood episode, episode recurrence, greater comorbidities, and increased risk for suicidal ideation and attempts in individuals with mood disorders. It summarizes the persistent alterations associated with childhood maltreatment, including alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and inflammatory cytokines, which may contribute to disease vulnerability and a more pernicious disease course. Finally, the consequences of child abuse and neglect on treatment outcomes and prevention strategies are described.

The Medical University of South Carolina designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1.0 Credit(s)™.

At the completion of the presentation, attendees will be able to:

1. Discuss how genetic polymorphisms and epigenetics effect psychiatric disease vulnerability.

2. Explain how a gene variation effects brain development and function so that the risk of a depressive episode or PTSD is increased.

3. Describe how early life experience produces persistent CNS alterations and its implications.

 

To join the training session

Session number: 120 069 7704

Session password: 7Ru9JX

1. Go to https://musc.webex.com/musc/k2/j.php?MTID=t8bd221948cfdca3787fa98faa8431c87

2. Enter your name and email address.

3. Enter the session password: 7Ru9JX

4. Click "Join Now".

5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.