Neurosurgery residents group photo

Neurosurgery Residency Program

 

The Medical University of South Carolina

Founded in 1824 in Charleston, The Medical University of South Carolina is the oldest medical school in the South. Today, MUSC continues the tradition of excellence in education, research, and patient care. MUSC educates and trains more than 3,000 students and residents, and has nearly 13,000 employees, including approximately 1,500 faculty members in six colleges (Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy). As the largest non-federal employer in Charleston, the university and its affiliates have collective annual budgets in excess of $2.2 billion. MUSC Health operates a 700-bed medical center, which includes the only nationally recognized Children's Hospital in the state, the Center for Telehealth, the Ashley River Tower (cardiovascular, digestive disease, and surgical oncology), Hollings Cancer Center (a National Cancer Institute-designated center), Level I Trauma Center, Institute of Psychiatry, and the state’s only transplant center.  

Neurosurgery Residency Program

The MUSC Neurosurgery Residency Program was established in 1964 by its first formally trained neurosurgeon, Dr. Julian Youmans, and was later approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) that same year. The residency program is now a seven-year program that is approved for two PGY1 neurosurgery positions annually.

Clinical activities are carried out at the Medical University Hospital, the MUSC Children’s Hospital, and the Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Read more about the history of MUSC’s Neurosurgery Program.

Residency Leadership

Alejandro Spiotta

Alejandro Spiotta, M.D.

Residency Program Director

Stephen Kalhorn

Stephen Kalhorn, M.D.

Associate Program Director

wyatt 

Teena C. Wyatt

Residency & Fellowship Program Coordinator

Program Details

PGY 1: The first year of the training program involves clinical training in Neuro-Intensive Care medicine in the Neuro-ICU at the Medical University of South Carolina; as well as rotations in skull-base neurosurgery, cerebrovascular neurosurgery, neuro-oncology, epilepsy, spinal neurosurgery, functional/stereotactic neurosurgery, neuroendovascular surgery and one month of trauma surgery.  The first year also includes ward services at the Medical University of South Carolina.

PGY 2-3: During the second and third years (‘Junior resident’), under increased responsibility and autonomy under the direction of the chief residents and faculty, trainees obtain a comprehensive introduction to clinical neurosurgery and related disciplines at the Medical University of South Carolina Hospital.  The trainees will have broad exposure to all facets of neurosurgical care in the inpatient and outpatient settings.  Trainees will gain progressively increasing clinical responsibility in the operating room, the hospital, and outpatient settings.  Additionally, all trainees will have full exposure to inpatient and outpatient management of a broad range of neurosurgical problems.  There is also a progressive increase in the teaching responsibilities for medical students and other residents.

Operating roomPGY 4: This year (‘Senior resident’) serves as a transition to chief year.  Residents oversee the care of pediatric patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings at the Medical University of South Carolina Children’s Hospital for six months, then at the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center for six months.  During this time, they are given increased autonomy under the direction of faculty and follow patients longitudinally from preoperative evaluations, to inpatient care and ambulatory clinic follow up.

PGY 5: During the fifth year, trainees serve as the junior chief resident at the Medical University of South Carolina Hospital, Medical University of South Carolina Children’s Hospital, and Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center.  The large clinical service at these hospitals is divided between two or three chief residents.  During the year, trainees will rotate between the services at regular intervals.  Trainees will be involved in all levels of inpatient and outpatient clinic care, with increasing responsibility based on the individual’s experience and ability.

Operating roomPGY 6: In the sixth year, trainees will have the opportunity to spend the year dedicated to a research project of their choosing, with a broad range of basic and clinical science projects available through the department and medical center.  Faculty mentorship and guidance is provided to optimize the trainee’s experience.  Another option is to devote the year to an enfolded fellowship such as spine or endovascular.

PGY 7In the seventh and final year, trainees serve as the senior chief resident at the Medical University of South Carolina Hospital, the Medical University of South Carolina Children’s Hospital, and the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center.  The large clinical service at these hospitals is divided between two or three chief residents.  During the year, trainees will rotate between the services at regular intervals.  Trainees will be involved in all levels of inpatient and outpatient clinic care, with increasing responsibility based on the individual’s experience and ability.  In addition, the senior resident will have additional administrative duties including: the organization of neurosurgical conferences, resident block schedules, and call schedules.

Sample Block Schedule 2019-2020 (PDF)