Movement Disorders Fellowship

Gonzalo Revuelta in the operating roomThe MUSC Movement Disorders Fellowship offers a comprehensive, well-balanced, individualized one to two-year fellowship program, depending on the selected track. The first year will be spent primarily in the clinical study of movement disorders with direct patient care and clinic responsibilities, including: the assessment and medical management of movement disorders (Parkinson’s disease, atypical parkinsonism, essential tremor, ataxia, dystonia, tic disorders, Huntington’s disease, amongst others); specialized training in the evaluation and management of deep brain stimulation patients including an introduction to intraoperative physiology; and performance of EMG and ultrasound guided botulinum toxin injections. The second year will be tailored to the specific interests of the fellow and can include more in-depth training in DBS (intraoperative neurophysiology and advanced programming), advanced botulinum toxin injections, clinical trials, or independent research. Fellows may also choose to seek a Master of Science in clinical research (MSCR) or a clinical research certificate in this time. Visit the MUSC Health Movement Disorders page and the MUSC Health Deep Brain Stimulation Program page to find out about these programs and centers.

Requirements:

Completed ACGME accredited Residency in Neurology, board eligible, for all but research and international tracks.

Tracks:

 
  1. Clinical Track (1 year): Fellows in this track have completed a neurology residency and typically seek a career in general neurology with a specialized focus in movement disorders, or a career in movement disorders in a private practice setting.  Candidates with prior research training who seek additional clinical training or with other subspecialized training seeking to gain or switch into the field of movement disorders may also benefit from this option. If a research or greater clinical interest arises during this one-year experience, some candidates may choose to remain for a second year of training.
  2. Clinician-Researcher Track (2 years): Fellows in this track have completed a neurology residency, will complete all clinical training as in the first year clinical track and in the second year, they may seek to actively participate in ongoing projects in one of the movement disorder labs, pursue their own research interests or seek greater exposure to clinical trials. A Master of Science in Clinical Research may also be available to these candidates during this period. Graduates of this track typically seek academic positions with a significant research component.
  3. Clinician-Educator Track (2 years): Fellows in this track have completed a neurology residency, will complete all clinical training in the first year clinical track and choose to receive additional training in intraoperative neurophysiology, advanced DBS programming, advanced botulinum toxin injections, including ultrasound guidance, and exposure to clinical trials.  Graduates of this track typically seek academic positions as clinician educators.
  4. Research Track (1-2 years): This is not a clinical fellowship, therefore, a neurology residency is not required. MD and or PhD candidates can be considered depending on their interests and available funding. Graduates of this track typically seek research careers, however, this may serve as a bridge toward clinical training.
  5. International Track (1-2 years): This is a one to two year experienced for candidates who have completed a neurology residency outside of the United States and seek to have subspecialty training in movement disorders. Candidates may choose a more clinical or research focused experience depending on their interests. Graduates of this fellowship will not be board eligible to practice neurology in the United States, but will have the necessary training to practice as movement disorder neurologists in their country of origin.

Faculty

Christine Cooper, M.D.

Christine Cooper, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Neurology
Residency: Harvard University
Fellowship: Movement Disorders at University of Pennsylvania
Interests: Vascular Parkinsonism, Imaging

Vanessa Hinson, M.D., Ph.D

Vanessa Hinson, M.D.

Professor of Neurology
Director, Movement Disorders Division
Residency: MUSC
Fellowship: Movement Disorders at Rush University
Interests: PD cognition, neuroprotection, functional neurologic disorders

Lilia Lovera, M.D.

Lilia Lovera, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Neurology
Residency: Loyola University
Fellowship: Movement Disorders at University of Cincinnati
Interests: Clinical Movement Disorders

Shabbir Merchant, M.D.

Shabbir Merchant, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Neurology
Residency : Drexel University
Fellowship : Movement Disorders at Columbia University, NIH
Interests : Motor Control Physiology, DBS

Gonzalo J. Revuelta, DO

Gonzalo Revuelta, D.O.

Associate Professor of Neurology
Medical Director, Deep Brain Stimulation
Associate Director, Movement Disorders Division
Director, Movement Disorders Fellowship
Residency: Drexel University
Fellowship: Movement Disorders at Emory University
Interests: Freezing of Gait, neuromodulation, DBS

Federico Rodriguez-Porcel, M.D.

Federico Rodriguez-Porcel, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Neurology
Residency: Loyola University
Fellowship: Movement Disorders and Behavioral Neurology at University of Cincinnati
Interests: Cognition, Aphasia, Imaging

Travis Turner, Ph.D.

Travis Turner, Ph.D.

Director, Neuropsychology Division
Fellowship: Neuropsychology at MUSC
Interests: PD cognition, PD biomarkers

Nathan Rowland, M.D, Ph.D.

Nathan Rowland, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery
Director, Neurophysiology Surgical Laboratory
Residency: UCSF
Fellowship: Functional Neurosurgery at University of Toronto
Interests: Functional Neurosurgery, Neuromodulation, Motor Control Physiology

Istvan Takacs, M.D.

Istvan Takacs, M.D.

Associate Professor of Neurosurgery
Director, Functional Neurosurgery
Residency: University of Linkoping, Karolinska Hospital
Fellowship: Functional Neurosurgery at University of Toronto and University of Arizona
Interests: Functional Neurosurgery

 

 

How to Apply

MUSC participates in the SF Match Program and applications will be submitted through the match program online.

Interviews will occur in the Spring-Summer of each year with an application deadline of June 30th. Fellowship positions may remain open, and candidates may submit their application materials directly to the fellowship coordinator when applying for these positions. Interviews for these applicants will be determined by the fellowship director and planned accordingly. Candidates should submit the following:

  • Current Curriculum Vitae (CV)
  • Personal statement
  • Three letters of recommendation

Previous Fellows 

2011 Kathryn Gaines, DO Clinical Track Private Practice, Wisconsin
2012 Kathleen Woschkolup, M.D. Clinical Track Private Practice, SC
2014 Guttalu Kumaraswammy, M.D., Ph.D. Research Track MUSC, Neurology Residency, Stroke fellowship, Private Practice, NC (Stroke)
2016 Anupama Kale, M.D. Clinical Track Dent Neurologic Institute, NY
2019 Colin McLeod, M.D. Clinician Educator Track Faculty, Augusta University/MCG

Contact

For more information contact:

jerri obanner

Jerri O’Banner

stanleyj@musc.edu
843-792-0078

jean dangerfield

Jean Dangerfield

danger@musc.edu
843-792-7262