Behavioral Medicine Track (155214)

The Behavioral Medicine Track offers a variety of training experiences that address the relationship between psychological functioning and physical health. These rotations involve multi-disciplinary training in a variety of in- and outpatient settings with both civilian and veteran populations in specialty and primary care settings. The patient populations seen in these rotations are quite diverse, as are the service settings.

Behavior Medicine Clinic (BM-IOP)

There are four, six-month, half-time Behavioral Medicine Rotation slots offered each semester. On these rotations, interns receive a wide array of clinical experiences geared toward the delivery of multi-disciplinary services to adolescent and adult (majority) patients with a variety of general medical issues and chronic illnesses. Interns will gain fluency in a range of psychological/behavioral medicine services including but not limited to interviewing, assessment, psychological testing, individual psychotherapy, consultation, applied physiology, treatment-planning, and oral & written communication with a variety of medical specialties and interprofessional health care teams.

IOP — Behavioral Medicine Clinic

Interns see patients for individual psychotherapy geared toward helping them manage chronic medical conditions and associated psychosocial complications. The clinic has relationships with a number of medical specialties and departments at MUSC, and we provide comprehensive psychosocial services for patients with problems such as chronic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, pancreatitis, headache, sleep problems, hypertension, Crohn's disease, fibromyalgia, non-epileptic event disorder, conversion disorder, diabetes, and many others. Additionally, interns provide services for improving health behaviors, including weight management related to bariatric surgery and smoking cessation. Interns will get hands-on experience in multidisciplinary treatment, providing cognitive psychotherapy, biofeedback, behavioral therapy, hypnosis, and integrative psychotherapeutic approaches. Interns are expected to communicate relevant treatment-planning information to a variety of providers including physicians, physician assistants, nurses, and nurse-practitioners.

Clinical Activities

Intern clinical activities will broadly be divided into three training experiences: (1) individual therapy, (2) organ pre-transplant psychosocial evaluation, and (3) bariatric pre-surgical psychosocial evaluation.

Behavioral Medicine Individual Psychotherapy

Interns see patients in the Behavioral Medicine Clinic for individual psychotherapy geared toward helping them manage chronic medical conditions and associated psycho-social complications. The Behavioral Medicine Clinic has relationships with a number of medical specialties and departments at MUSC and we provide comprehensive psycho-social services for patients with problems such as: chronic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, pancreatitis, headache, sleep problems, hypertension, Crohn's disease, fibromyalgia, non-epileptic event disorder, conversion disorder, diabetes, and many, many others. These patients have rich histories often including trauma and substance abuse. Additionally, interns will provide services for improving health behaviors, including weight management related to bariatric surgery and smoking cessation. Interns will follow several bariatric and transplant candidates/patients for pre-hab and rehab and recovery. Interns will get hands-on experience in multidisciplinary treatment, providing cognitive psychotherapy, biofeedback, behavioral therapy, hypnosis, integrative psychotherapeutic approaches, and are expected to communicate relevant treatment-planning information to a variety of medical disciplines including physicians, physician-assistants, nurses and nurse- practitioners.

Organ Transplant Pre-Surgical Psychosocial Evaluation

Interns will conduct comprehensive evaluations and offer outpatient psychotherapy services for patients that are being considered for heart, liver, kidney, lung, and pancreatic islet cell autotransplantation. Interns will administer neuropsychological, cognitive, and personality screening measures, make referrals for further comprehensive psychological testing if indicated, make recommendations about the appropriateness of patients for the transplant surgery, as well as assess their abilities to process and manage post-operative medical recommendations. Additionally, the intern will follow several patients for regular psychotherapy pre and post transplantation. These services are highly respected by the transplant teams, and will engage in frequent communication regarding our treatment to improve patient’s candidacy and optimize transplant outcomes.

Bariatric Pre-Surgical Psychosocial Evaluation

Interns will conduct comprehensive evaluations and offer outpatient psychotherapy services for patients that are seeking bariatric surgery (gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, laparoscopic adjustable gastric band revisions, duodenal switch). Interns will administer psychological tests, make referrals for further comprehensive psychological testing if indicated, make recommendations about the appropriateness of patients for the bariatric surgery, as well as assess their abilities to process and manage post-operative medical and dietary recommendations. Additionally, the intern will follow several patients for regular psychotherapy pre- and post- bariatric surgery. These services are highly respected by the bariatric team and will engage in frequent communication regarding our treatment to improve patient’s candidacy and optimize bariatric surgery outcomes.

The intern will also follow patients for psychotherapy pre- and post-surgery (transplant and/or bariatric). These services are highly respected by the referring medical teams, who contact us frequently regarding our treatment to optimize surgical outcomes. By the end of the rotation, the intern will be able to:

  • Use science-informed approach to evaluation and evidence-based assessment to evaluate patients that are being considered for bariatric, transplant, or other surgery; identify psychosocial risk and resilience factors; and formulate pre- and/or post-surgical recommendations.
  • Prepare and apply empirically supported and evidence-based psychotherapeutic interventions, including surgical preparedness, to patients with comorbid medical conditions (e.g., obesity, end stage organ disease, chronic pain, epilepsy) and their families engaged in medical care; and to accurately track and monitor patient’s progress in treatment via clinical observation and psychological testing.
  • Identify and respond to the unique psychosocial challenges associated with diverse patients that are engaged in psychiatric and medical care. Diversity includes but is not limited to age, SES, medical diagnosis, mental health diagnosis, race, cultural background, religiosity, sexual orientation, and educational status.
  • Integrate psychological evaluation, treatment, and recommendations through verbal and written interactions with the medical teams and as an effective provider in interprofessional health care teams.
  • Apply appropriate ethical and legal standards when working with patients with comorbid medical and psychological illnesses across the lifespan. This includes discussing with patient (and as relevant, medical providers) limits of confidentiality, reporting safety concerns, and maintaining appropriate privacy of patient while communicating case conceptualizations and treatment recommendations to the interprofessional team and family/caregivers.
  • Use the research literature to guide the appropriate selection, implementation, and adaptation of treatment and assessment approaches for patient care, incorporating various factors such as sociodemographics, medical diagnoses and/or presenting symptoms, and presenting concerns. Reviews research to obtain additional education when providing services outside of clinical competency or seeing a unique presentation.

Bio-Behavioral Medicine Seminar

Interns meet with faculty weekly to discuss issues relevant to clinical service provision for patients with chronic illnesses. Clinicians from a variety of disciplines present lectures on a variety of topics relevant to behavioral medicine.

Location of Rotation

MUSC Institute of Psychiatry, Division of Bio-Behavioral Medicine

Clinic Hours

The Behavioral Medicine Clinic in IOP schedules patients from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., with patients being asked to arrive as early as 7:30 a.m. (30 minutes before their first appointment), and staying until 5:30 p.m. to finish evaluations or paperwork.

Faculty

Behavior Medicine Clinic (BM-DVA)

This rotation provides training experiences in three specialty clinics within the VAMC Behavioral Medicine Service. These clinics are briefly described below.

Interdisciplinary Pain Program

Interns work closely with an interdisciplinary team (e.g., anesthesiology, psychology, nursing, pharmacy, and psychiatry) in the assessment and treatment of veterans referred with a variety of chronic pain complaints.

Weight Management Program (MOVE)

Interns provide services within the VA’s weight management program. They will work with a multidisciplinary team to engage patients in motivational enhancement strategies to address health behavior change and weight loss strategies.

After completing the VA Behavioral Medicine Rotation, the intern will be able to:

  • Accurately assess psychosocial factors and co-morbid mental health diagnoses related to the relevant patient populations experience among individuals seeking care through the health care teams served by this rotation (Interdisciplinary Pain Clinic, MOVE Weight Management Program, Behavioral Medicine Clinic).
  • Develop evidence-based treatment plans for chronic pain based on the psychosocial assessments.
  • Effectively use techniques of motivational interviewing and other motivational enhancement strategies to address health behavior change.
  • Work effectively in consultation with professionals within an interdisciplinary team setting (i.e., physicians, nurses, dieticians, and pharmacists).
  • Deliver evidence-based treatments for relevant patient populations in both individual and group settings.

Location of Rotation

Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center

Clinic Hours

VA hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Faculty

 

Hollings Cancer Center (HCC)

Interns provide psychological services for patients (and families of patients) who are being treated through the MUSC Hollings Cancer Center, the only NCI Designated Cancer in South Carolina. The intern provides consultation services for the various oncological treatment teams and sees individual patients for psychotherapeutic management of cancer-related psychosocial issues (including disease management, pain management, and end-of-life issues) and co-morbid psychiatric disorders. Interns also provide psychological assessment services to assist in the multi-disciplinary determination of eligibility for bone marrow or stem cell transplantation.

By the end of the rotation, the intern will be able to:

  • Effectively evaluate patients who are being considered for bone marrow or stem cell transplantation, identify resilience and risk factors related to surgical intervention, and formulate pre- and/or post-transplant recommendations.
  • Prepare, competently apply, and effectively monitor empirically supported psychotherapeutic interventions to patients with cancer and their families.
  • Integrate psychological treatment and recommendations through verbal and written consultations with medical teams and as an effective provider in multidisciplinary teams.
  • Identify and respond to the unique psychosocial challenges associated with diverse patients during cancer diagnosis, treatment, and recovery.

Location of Rotation

Hollings Cancer Center, MUSC

Clinic Hours

Hollings Cancer Center operating hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Faculty

Pain Rehabilitation Program

This rotation provides training experience in the Pain Rehabilitation Program at MUSC, the first intensive outpatient rehabilitation program for patients with chronic pain and opioid use in South Carolina. The program employs an interprofessional team of providers including pain management and addictions physicians, psychologists, physical and occupational therapists, and nurses to functionally rehabilitate patients with chronic pain while simultaneously discontinuing prescription opioids. Approximately 60% of patients enter the Pain Rehab Program on chronic opioids, and about 80% of these patients fully taper off their pain medications while in the program. Patients complete three psychology groups per day, focused on topics like mindfulness, stress management, sleep hygiene, and activity pacing, in addition to physical therapy, occupational therapy, and medication tapering. Goals of the program include improved functioning, reduced impact of pain on daily life, improved mood and quality of life, and elimination of prescription opioid use.

Both chronic pain and prescription opioid misuse are significant problem across South Carolina, and particularly in rural, underserved areas. Unfortunately, many individuals in these areas need care for chronic pain and/or opioid problems but do not have access to appropriate treatment. To improve access to care, the Pain Rehab Program is working to expand some of its services outside the structured, intensive outpatient programming in Charleston. Outreach to these underserved regions is done using several methods: 1) telehealth screening/assessment with goal of helping patients join the Pain Rehab Program (grants are currently available to assist with lodging and transportation); 2) telehealth brief interventions for those who are unable or unwilling to complete the Pain Rehab Program; and 3) direct outreach and screening via in-person, community visits to underserved areas.

Clinical Activities

  • Interns will provide direct, clinic-based services within the PRP intensive outpatient program on MUSC’s campus. These activities would include pre-program entry assessment to assess extent of opioid use and psychosocial evaluation of chronic pain; group psychotherapy services using cognitive-behavioral and acceptance and commitment therapy approaches to pain management; and individual psychotherapy using motivational interviewing to help patients overcome personal or situational barriers to program participation.
  • Interns will provide telehealth services to 1) screen/assess patients in rural, underserved areas who may be appropriate for Pain Rehab, and 2) provide evidence-based interventions (e.g., MI, CBT, ACT) for patients who, for logistical reasons, cannot participate in the on-campus intensive outpatient program. 
  • Interns will participate in monthly outreach/screening trips to rural, underserved communities in South Carolina. These trips will be conducted in conjunction with other MUSC outreach programs.

At the conclusion of the rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Accurately identify patients at risk for OUD using evidence-based screening methods.
  • Effectively and efficiently conduct comprehensive assessments to identify psychological, behavioral, medical, and/or social factors that could impact patient engagement in a chronic pain rehabilitation program.
  • Provide evidence-based psychological interventions (e.g., cognitive behavioral treatment, acceptance and commitment therapy, and motivational interviewing) in both individual and group formats for chronic pain patients.
  • Identify and respond to unique psychosocial challenges associated with diverse patients with chronic pain, especially those that represent treatment barriers facing underserved patients in rural SC counties.
  • Integrate and share psychological data through verbal and written interactions with the interdisciplinary team.
  • Use telehealth service delivery methods effectively to provide all required patient care activities.
  • Document the delivery of services and patient responses to services appropriately and in a timely manner in each patient's electronic medical record.

Location of Rotation

MUSC Wellness Center

Outreach to rural, underserved areas in South Carolina (estimated once/month). Interns will either join an existing outreach trip on an MUSC-sponsored vehicle or ride in the vehicle of a direct supervisor.

Clinic Hours

8am to 5pm

Faculty

Pain-STAR Program VA

Veterans in the catchment area of the Ralph Johnson VAMC have high rates of OUD. A significant number of those veterans have co-morbid chronic pain (as well as other diagnoses, including mental health and substance abuse problems). At present, in order to receive services in the Interdisciplinary Pain Clinic, patients who have OUD issues must successfully complete a course of substance abuse treatment prior to onset of chronic pain services. The PainSTAR clinic will significantly alter this service flow by providing simultaneous pain and OUD treatment services. In this sense, the PainSTAR program is a smaller version of the MUSC PRP rotation described above, in that it provides integrated and coordinated pain and OUD services, although in a less intensive format than the PRP.

The purpose of this rotation is to provide extensive clinical experience in the intersection between substance abuse, chronic pain, and comorbid medical/psychiatric conditions within the VAMC setting. Referrals to PainSTAR will come from the Interdisciplinary Pain team, the STAR (substance abuse) clinic, primary care services throughout the VA hospital, the Primary Care-Mental Health Integration clinic, and various specialty clinics (e.g., Neurology, Physical Medicine/Rehab). Referred patients will be assessed by the psychology intern, who will staff the case with the interdisciplinary team (consisting of anesthesiologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and the supervising psychologists, Drs. Kathryn Bottonari and Layne Goble). The team will develop a care plan that incorporates pain treatment components and substance abuse treatment .

Interns will provide individual and group treatment addressing both the pain and OUD elements of the care plans. Because the catchment area of the VA is so geographically spread out, a significant portion of services are provided using both home-based (the patient receives services at home) and clinic-based (the patient travels to a nearby community-based outreach clinic, or CBOC) telehealth services. This is especially the case for veterans living in Horry County, which has the highest prevalence of OUD diagnoses, but is the most distant county from the VAMC within SC. Telehealth treatment services will be used extensively to deliver services to those PainSTAR clinic patients living in the distant areas of the catchment area. The PainSTAR clinic training model is based on a "scaffolding approach" in which interns start out observing, then co-leading, then running diagnostic assessments, individual psychotherapy, and group psychotherapy. Because of the large numbers of OUD patients in Charleston, Dorchester, and Horry counties, and the large overlap of OUD and chronic pain, we anticipate that services in this clinic will be in very high demand. Therefore, at least 90% of the intern’s training time on this rotation will be centered on OUD-related interventions, and approximately 40% of their clinical activities will involve telehealth service delivery to patients in Horry County (and other rural areas within the catchment area).

At the conclusion of the rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Accurately identify patients at risk for OUD using evidence-based screening methods
  • Assess psychological, behavioral, and social factors that could impact patient engagement in a combined OUD/chronic pain treatment program
  • Provide evidence-based psychological interventions (e.g., cognitive behavioral treatment, acceptance and commitment therapy, and motivational interviewing) in both individual and group formats for OUD patients with chronic pain
  • Identify and respond to unique psychosocial challenges associated with veteran status, especially those that represent treatment barriers facing patients who live in outlying areas
  • Integrate and share psychological data through verbal and written interactions with the interdisciplinary team
  • Use telehealth service delivery methods effectively to provide all required patient care activities
  • Document the delivery of services and patient responses to services appropriately and in a timely manner in each patient’s VA medical record.

Location of Rotation

Outreach to patients in Horry County and other rural areas within the catchment area.

Clinic Hours

VA hours are 8am-4:30pm

Faculty

Kathryn Bottonari, Ph.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor

Layne Goble, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor


Telehealth Resilience & Recovery Program (TRRP)

The Telehealth Resilience and Recovery Program is a multi-disciplinary experience that provides an opportunity to work with children and adults who experienced traumatic injury. Once enrolled in our service via our level-1 trauma center, these patients are monitored for emotional recovery and offered mental health assessment and treatment as needed. PTSD and depression are prevalent in this population. Interns provide psychoeducation in our acute care setting, assist patients in remote monitoring of emotional recovery, and conduct telehealth-based assessment and treatment for patients who develop PTSD or depression. Exposure-based treatments, behavioral activation, and other best practice interventions are used most often.

The intern functions as an integral part of the treatment team and is involved in every aspect of patient care. Specifically, the intern participates in assessment and diagnosis of PTSD, depression, and other psychological conditions using a multi-dimensional assessment approach, and then implements individual and family behavioral treatment approaches, such as Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), Prolonged Exposure (PE), and stress management techniques, as indicated. Interns also gain an understanding of systemic issues related to continuity of care and interdisciplinary management of clinical cases. Participating interns may be involved in pilot studies and clinical trials, if appropriate, and programmatic development of the telehealth service for trauma patients.

(Note: This rotation is considered both a Behavioral Medicine and Traumatic Stress track rotation.)

At the end of the rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Identify trauma-related symptoms and accurately diagnose trauma-related disorders among child and adult survivors of serious traumatic injury using psychometrically valid interview-oriented measures.
  • Track and accurately interpret patient mental health recovery following their discharge using psychometrically validated approaches to determine need for services and monitor progress in telehealth treatment.
  • Deliver with fidelity best-practice treatments for PTSD and depression, such as Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), Prolonged Exposure (PE), and Behavioral Activation (BA).
  • Document the delivery of assessment and telehealth treatment services and patient responses to services appropriately in each patient's electronic medical record.

Location of Rotation

MUSC Emergency Department and Department of Psychiatry

Clinic Hours

TRRP operates from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. to accommodate patients' work and school schedules.

Faculty

Tobacco Treatment Program (TTP)

Clinical experiences are geared toward the delivery of psychological services to patients who smoke and have a variety of medical issues and chronic illnesses. Interns work in an outpatient clinic at Hollings Cancer Center and in all inpatient hospitals at MUSC (Main Hospital, Ashley River Tower Hospital, Institute of Psychiatry, and Children’s Hospital), providing one-on-one patient care.

Hollings Cancer Center Tobacco Treatment Program Outpatient Clinic

Interns see patients for individual psychotherapy geared toward helping them change their tobacco use and manage chronic medical and psychiatric problems and associated psychosocial complications. Although our primary charge is for cancer patients treated at Hollings, patients from a variety of other clinics are seen (e.g., cardiology, pulmonology, etc.). Patients are seen in our dedicated clinic space and the medical floors and in infusion settings. In addition to tobacco treatment, interns provide services for improving other psychological issues (e.g., depression). Interns will get hands-on experience in multidisciplinary treatment, providing motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral psychotherapy. Interns are expected to communicate relevant treatment-planning information to a variety of medical disciplines including physicians, physician-assistants, nurses, and nurse-practitioners.

MUSC Health Tobacco Treatment Program Inpatient Care

Interns conduct brief evaluations and psychotherapeutic interventions for admitted inpatients for all patients in our hospitals. Interns administer interventions to both patients and their family members, including the parents of children admitted to our Children’s Hospital.

By the end of the rotation, the intern will be able to:

  • Accurately assess nicotine dependence and strength of nicotine dependence, and psychosocial factors and co-morbid mental health diagnoses among patients served by the TTP.
  • Develop evidence-based treatment plans for nicotine dependence and other diagnoses.
  • Effectively use techniques of motivational interviewing and other motivational enhancement strategies to address health behavior change.
  • Effectively deliver Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to patients in the Tobacco Treatment Program.
  • Work effectively in consultation with professionals within an interdisciplinary team setting.
  • Identify and respond to the unique psychosocial challenges associated with diverse patients who are engaged in psychiatric and medical care. Diversity includes but is not limited to age, SES, medical diagnosis, mental health diagnosis, race, cultural background, religiosity, sexual orientation, and educational status.

Location of Rotation

Hollings Cancer Center, MUSC

Clinic Hours

8 .a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

Faculty

Weight Management Clinic (WMC)

The MUSC Weight Management Center is a multidisciplinary center that offers a full range of evidence-based weight management programs to the greater Charleston community. We are staffed with psychologists, registered dietitians, exercise physiologists, physicians, and a registered nurse. Interns interested in the assessment and treatment of overweight and obese patients will have a variety of clinical, research, and teaching opportunities while on our clinical rotation. Specifically, our interns conduct in-person psychological screenings of new/potential patients, deliver evidence-based treatment protocols to patients in our various programs (both individual and group formats), regularly discuss patients with the multidisciplinary staff, and oversee/manage an individual caseload of patients.

After completing the Weight Management Center rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Effectively deliver evidence-based treatment plans for addressing overweight and obesity, and track patient progress. Related, intern will be able to recognize and help patients identify solutions to common cognitive and behavioral obstacles to successful long-term weight management.
  • Appropriately document in each patient's medical record the delivery of services and patient response to services.
  • Efficiently and comprehensively manage patient cases within a multidisciplinary medical setting.

Location of Rotation

Weight Management Center, MUSC

Satellite Clinic located up Dorchester Road

Personal transportation required to complete this rotation.

Clinic Hours

The Weight Management Center's hours are 8:30 a.m. to 6 or 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Fridays: 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Satellite clinic hours are currently in the afternoon until 6 p.m. on Tuesdays.

Faculty

Women’s Health and High Risk OB Clinic

Patients in the Women’s Health and High Risk OB Clinic are referred for psychiatric and behavioral risk factors related to pregnancy (OB population) as well as outside of pregnancy (GYN population). Patients present with high levels of trauma exposure, co-morbid psychiatric disorders, and substance use problems (including opiate use disorders) or high risk for opiate misuse. The patient population is racially and ethnically diverse, with high levels of socioeconomic disadvantage (approximately 80% low income). There is a high need for integrated medical and behavioral health care; until recently, the only services available were brief, supportive counseling and medication management provided by a consulting psychiatrist and psychiatry residents as well as brief psychological intervention to GYN populations by a psychology intern. Beginning in the 2020-2021 internship training year, integrated services provided by clinical psychology trainees will be expanded to serve high risk OB patients, including those seeking MAT and empirically supported intervention/relapse prevention for OUD during pregnancy.

Interns in the Women’s Health and High Risk OB Clinic will work with both obstetric (OB) and gynecological (GYN) populations, screening patients for the presence of psychiatric (depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, PTSD) symptoms and substance abuse risk behaviors and make a determination about the type of services recommended for the patient. These may include counseling around wellness and general health, prenatal dietary and lifestyle management, psychotherapeutic interventions or emotional disorders, and/or interventions to reduce substance use, including MAT for OUD; services will be delivered both in person and via tele-health. Interns will function as part of a multidisciplinary team of OBGYN physicians, nurses, psychiatry residents and fellows, and clinical psychology professionals. In addition to individual counseling, intern training opportunities may include facilitation of virtual groups for relapse prevention of OUD in OB populations, utilizing telehealth to maximize patient reach.

At the end of the rotation, interns will be able to:

Effectively screen for mood, anxiety, trauma-related, and substance use problems among underserved, high-risk women.

  • Effectively screen for mood, anxiety, trauma-related, and substance use problems among underserved, high-risk women.
  • Deliver, with fidelity, evidence-based and best practice interventions to reduce mood, anxiety, PTSD, and substance use problems, as well as short-term health-related counseling (e.g., weight management, health maintenance).
  • Provide effective behavioral health intervention to support MAT for OUD in appropriate patients.
  • Use telehealth service delivery methods effectively to provide all required assessment and intervention activities.
  • Interact and consult effectively with a multi-disciplinary (OBGYN physicians, psychiatrists, psychiatry residents and fellows, nurses) treatment team within a primary care setting.
  • Educate multi-disciplinary healthcare providers about behavioral health factors that affect the healthcare industry.
  • Document the delivery of services and patient response to services appropriately in each patient's MUSC electronic health record.
  • Accurately monitor, demonstrate sensitivity, and apply knowledge of others as diverse individuals and cultural beings in assessment, treatment, and consultation.

Location of Rotation

The Women’s Health and High Risk OB Clinic intern operates out of 2 clinical sites - one that is on the MUSC main campus downtown (1 day per week) and another clinical site in North Charleston that is approximately 15 miles (approximately 20 min drive) off the main campus (1 day per week). Interns are required to provide their own transportation to the site.

Clinic Hours

Hours at the downtown location are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Hours at the North Charleston location are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Faculty